Jerry Johnston Interviews J.P. Moreland on the Success of the 21st Century Church

14 October 2016

I had the opportunity and honor to interviewJ.P. Moreland, the Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University in La Mirada, California. Moreland is a leading Christian thinker in this nation and the world. During the course of his life, he has co-planted three churches, spoken and debated on over 175 college campuses around the country, and served with Campus Crusade for Christ for 10 years. Moreland’s ideas have been covered by both popular religious and non-religious outlets, including the New Scientist and PBS’s “Closer to Truth,” Christianity Today and WORLD magazine. He has authored or co-authored 30 books and published over 70 articles in scholarly journals. In our conversation, we discussed the dramatic shift in the church over the last 100 years, and he said:

“In fact, Os Guinness wrote a book a few years ago called The Gravedigger File, where he made the point that some of the very tools the church was using to gain short term success, by making its message easy to understand and making things comfortable for people, ultimately became the church’s gravedigger over the long haul.  And you cannot have a flourishing church if you don’t have Christians valuing learning why they believe what they believe and being able to graciously, without being angry, to speak and dialogue about those in the public square.”

Do you value learning why you believe what you believe? You may have the courage to stand up for your beliefs, but can you defend them? Cristie Jo and I are producing a documentary and accompanying church and individual resources to help Christians understand and defend their faith. 

J.P. Moreland is the Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University in La Mirada, California.

Researchers, Drs. Jerry and Cristie Jo Johnston, are Executive Producing a quick-paced film via trans continental, staccato interviews documenting the shocking rise of the non-religious.